Spring 2018

Preview Edition

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{ Spring 2018 }

Contents

42

Tiny homes promise to solve Colorado’s big housing problems—but only if we find a way to make them fit in.

By TonI Mclellan

48

Of fermentation, that is. Meet five NoCo women who are poised to change what you sip—for the better.

By josie sexton

54

With help from those on the NoCo front lines we get to the heart of the matter.

By Andrew Kensley

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{ Spring 2018 }

Tiny homes promise to solve Colorado’s big housing problems—but only if we find a way to make them fit in.

By Toni McLellan

Hunter Buffington lives off the grid in Larimer County, Colorado near Fort Collins. “I’d love to tell you where we’re based, but it’s technically illegal,” she says. The PR and event production manager lives with her husband and son in a converted bus dubbed The Rebel Ant. “She’s a rebel because she doesn’t follow the other ants in the colony,” says Buffington of her home on wheels. An advocate for the tiny house movement, Buffington is also breaking rank by living independently in an area where affordable housing and increasing population density are serious issues.

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Of fermentation, that is. Meet five NoCo women who are poised to change what you sip—for the better.

By Josie Sexton
Photography by Stephanie Powell

Brewing Manager | New Belgium Brewing

As a 21-year-old college graduate, Stephanie Palladino found herself managing 10 Anheuser-Busch union men the age of her dad. She had majored in chemistry and didn’t expect to put her degree toward brewing, but Palladino’s father worked at Budweiser and mentioned that it could be a potential career for her. “If he hadn’t said anything, it never would have occurred to me,” Palladino says. Eleven years later, she’s New Belgium’s brewing manager, leading 31 brewers and working with eight leadership members, making sure the fourth-largest craft brewery in the country puts out consistently good beer. She keeps her team on schedule and oversees the everyday production of brands from flagship Fat Tire to experimental Juicy Haze. But Palladino confesses that when she started working in breweries, she didn’t love beer. “I [eventually] fell in love with beer because of what it is as a science and what it is as an art,” Palladino says. She and her team enjoy discussing the next trends in craft beer and the latest ingredients, and they’ll also geek out over a perfected and replicated process in the lab. “You’re very much interacting with the science,” she says. It’s a message she has extended while working with middle-school girls in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) programs. And it’s a message she hopes to transmit when giving tours of the brewery to young women. “This is science?” the younger kids will ask, and she’ll answer: “Yes! This is science!”

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By Andrew Kensley

Forget what you think you know from cable news commentary and online echo chambers. With help from those on the front lines of NoCo’s immigration situation, we get to the heart of the matter.

The practice of seeking better lives, wherever it takes us, isn’t abating anytime soon.

According to the Migration Policy Institute, an independent, nonpartisan think tank, 43.3 million immigrants were living in the United States in 2015, or just over 13 percent of the total population. While this represents about a 30 percent increase since 2000, the number has remained relatively stable over the last 15 years.

Your state is home to over half a million immigrants—legal and otherwise.

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